Project Noah Fun Fact: Isabella tiger moth

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

From Project Noah:

The Isabella tiger moth (Pyrrharctia isabella) is a tiger moth very common in North America. Subjected to a temperate climate, the caterpillars, known as banded woolly bears, overwinter as caterpillars before turning into a pupa in the spring, the stage of development right before coming a moths. Since the caterpillars are exposed to relatively harsh temperatures in the winter, this species has become somewhat tolerant to short-term freezing periods in which the entire caterpillar is frozen and it thaws out. Longer-term freezing periods however can be harmful.

This moth is also the subject of some folklore in which it is said that the amount of the brown on the band determines the length of the forthcoming winter. This however, is just folklore and not scientifically based.

Banded Woolly Bear (Pyrrharctia isabella), spotted by user Carol Snow Milne.

National Moth Week is from July 22-30. Are you participating? Please register a public or private event here: http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2017/, especially if your country or region isn’t on the map yet!

Don’t forget to submit photos of moths you spot here!

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8841449

Read more about the Isabella tiger moth’s ability to tolerate freezing as a larva here.

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Project Noah Fun Fact: Walker’s Frother

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

From Project Noah:

Some tiger moths have glands that emit toxins when threatened. Many of these tiger moths are known in Australia as “frothers” for the bubbly toxins that come out of their thorax.

Walker's Frother (Amerila rubripes) spotted by user Felix Fleck on Project Noah.

Walker’s Frother (Amerila rubripes) spotted by user Felix Fleck on Project Noah.

National Moth Week is from July 22-30. Are you participating? Please register a public or private event here: http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2017/, especially if your country or region isn’t on the map yet!

Don’t forget to submit photos of moths you spot here!

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8841449

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Project Noah Fun Fact: Wasp Moth

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

From Project Noah:

Some tiger moths are excellent mimics of the order Hymenoptera, which includes ants, bees, sawflies, and wasps. They even have evolved a narrower abdomen and lost scales on some wings to mimic the narrow waist present in many hymenopterans, resulting in excellent wasp and ant mimics.

Wasp Moth (Myrmecopsis strigosa), spotted by user Tom15 on Project Noah.

National Moth Week is from July 22-30. Are you participating? Please register a public or private event here: http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2017/, especially if your country or region isn’t on the map yet!

Don’t forget to submit photos of moths you spot here!

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8841449

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Project Noah Fun Fact: Cinnabar moth

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

From Project Noah:

Yesterday we discussed the ability of some tiger moth species to jam bat sonar. Some tiger moths are also very chemically defended. Some moths may sequester toxic plant chemicals, while others break down toxic chemicals found in their host plants and create new toxins for defense. Many organisms that are chemically defended also have aposematic, or warning coloration to indicate to predators that they are chemically defended.

The Cinnabar moth (Tyria jacobeae) is a moth which is chemically defended and aposematically colored, meaning it has warning coloration. It is native to Europe but was introduced in Oregon where is has been a successful biocontrol agent in the management of the invasive tansy ragwort.

Cinnibar moth (Tyria jacobeae), spotted by user Brian38 on Project Noah.

Cinnabar moth (Tyria jacobeae), spotted by user Brian38 on Project Noah.

National Moth Week is from July 22-30. Are you participating? Please register a public or private event here: http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2017/, especially if your country or region isn’t on the map yet!

Don’t forget to submit photos of moths you spot here!

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8841449

Read more about efforts to use the Cinnabar moth to control the invasive tansy ragwort here.

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The Nature Conservancy Moth Night @ the Kay Center, New Jersey, USA

Original post was published on the Celery Farm and Beyond site, on July 23, 2017.

Can’t say that the weather cooperated, but folks had a thoroughly enjoyable Moth Night with The Nature Conservancy at the Kay Center in Chester last night.

Because of a light but unpredictable rain, we moved the old Mothra movie, the S’Mores and the popcorn inside, and then set up the Mercury vapor light and a sheet under an overhang outside.

We did not expect much moth activity.  All I can is, Boy, were we surprised.

Read more

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Project Noah Fun Fact: Bertholdia trigona

Happy National Moth Week 2017!

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah, will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

Continue reading

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Introducing LepSnap – Image Recognition for Moths & Butterflies – Guest post by André Poremski

LepSnap is a community field guide, created and edited by those who share a commitment to catalog the 175,000+ species of moths and butterflies around the world. It’s a smartphone app and web platform that uses image recognition AI (Artificial Intelligence) to help identify moths and butterflies (and caterpillars too!) in photos, which can be later verified by members of the LepSnap community.

At present, LepSnap is well-trained to identify commonly-encountered species of North American moths and butterflies, and we’re calling on all lep-lovers to help us train LepSnap to recognize all species worldwide. This ambitious project is a collaboration between LepNet/SCAN (a Symbiota data portal) and Fieldguide.net. You can join our community by downloading LepSnap for iPhone (Android version coming soon) or signing up on LepSnap.org.

LepSnap is, and will always be, a free, non-commercial public good.

More about LepSnap:
https://medium.com/@andrporemski/introducing-lepsnap-ff356c4c9da6

Download LepSnap for iPhone:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/lepsnap-by-fieldguide/id1167114017?mt=8

More about the Lepidoptera of North America Network (LepNet):
http://symbiota4.acis.ufl.edu/scan/lepnet/portal/index.php

Have feedback or ideas for how to make LepSnap better?
Say hello@fieldguide.net

 
 
 
 
 
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Like moths to a flame: National Moth Week, and how you can help our nighttime wildlife – by Dr. Callum J. Macgregor

The International Dark Sky Association is “the recognized authority on light pollution and is the leading organization combating light pollution worldwide.” In a blog on the organization’s website, Callum Macgregor, Ph.D., of the University of York in the United Kingdom, discusses the dangers of light pollution to moth populations. He praises National Moth Week as an opportunity to observe and document moths in habitats around the world that may be affected by light pollution.

Next week, as night falls, people across the USA and around the world will be found huddled in groups, waiting, staring into bright light sources. This is not some strange cult or ritual; in fact, these people are hoping to attract and observe moths—the mysterious and often beautiful denizens of the night. National Moth Week runs from July 22-30, and the organizers hope to encourage enthusiasts to “to learn about, observe, and document moths in their backyards, parks, and neighborhoods.”              Read more

 

 

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Bio-Art After Dark

Brandon B 2Artist/scientist Brandon Ballengée is back for National Moth Week 2017 with Bio-Art After Dark, an event featuring moths and other bugs attracted to ultraviolet light, music and more, to be held in Troy, NY.

Bio-Art After Dark: A Sanctuary Sustainer Soirée will feature music by Ryder Cooley & members of her band, Dust Bowl Faeries and a scandalous insect symposium with visiting bio-artist, Brandon Ballengée. Light refreshments (including artisanal bug pizza) included.

Click here for more information 

Brandon B 3 Brandon B 1

 

 

 

 

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More people than moths, Moth Night in Australia. Guest Post by: Dave Rentz

It was nice weather up to the moth night. It rained much of the time. We had about 40 visitors but they were driven to cover by the rain. At one stage there were more onlookers than insects on the light sheets. But we busied ourselves looking at the vegetation in the dark and the rain discovering spiders, frogs and some wet insects. 

 

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