Moth Night in Bedminster, NJ – September 22, 2017

09 2017 mothnight BedminsterNJ

Posted in event | Leave a comment

High Park, Toronto – Annual Moth Night Highlights for 2017. Gust post by Karen Yukich

Our event was held on July 26, which turned out to be a rainy evening. In spite of the less than promising conditions we were glad we went ahead anyway as those who did attend were quite keen and had a great time, especially the kids. The observations included a record high number of Gypsy Moths (15) and record low number of total species (45), of which 5 were new for this event.

This event is held each summer by the Toronto Entomologists’ Association in partnership with the High Park Nature Centre and High Park Nature. Cumulative results are posted here: http://www.highparknature.org/wiki/wiki.php?n=Insects.MothGallery

 Karen Yukich MothNite-2017-KY-290

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

First Time Mothing at our Backyard! Guest post by Yezzy, Venezuela

Venezuela is commonly known for its rich flora and fauna and its magnificent landscapes. It is a beautiful country with many wonders yet to discover. I’m Yezzy, a psychologist and a nature enthusiast who lives in a city called Maracaibo; one of the hottest and most humid cities in Venezuela, located west of the capital city, Caracas. I decided to join National Moth Week because Lisa Johnson, a friend and former science teacher of mine, invited me to the event. She knows how I have always had an interest in nature and science and over time she has shared with me her own experiences watching moths and identifying them.  I decided to try it myself, for fun, and to check out what species of moths would come to our lights. I never thought I would be so thrilled with mothing; even my teenage sister joined me through the whole process and is now making a notebook to record our research. I’ve seen moths in my city before, especially before raining season (Sept – Oct) or when we have very humid days, since we live close to a lake, humidity is always present.

It was quite late when I joined the NMW this year, but that didn’t stop me from leaving the lights on. We started setting up at dusk on July 30th in my backyard by hanging an old pale colored sheet and leaving the lights on until midnight. We went out every couple of minutes to check for any moth visitors but we didn’t get any for several hours. My sister was pretty pepped up about it and insisted on waiting a couple of hours past the end of NMW for them to appear. When we checked for the last time that night, we found a small visitor at last! It was very tiny and it moved around so much that we didn’t get the chance to photograph it unfortunately, but we both were so happy that at least one moth came to our first mothing night.

Before going to sleep we discussed our night and thought about possible reasons why we didn’t see many moths; maybe the light was not bright enough to attract them, maybe the type of light bulb was not the best, maybe we checked on them too frequently, maybe we need to use bait, maybe the season was not good for mothing, maybe the plants around the sheet might have made a confined area that the moths did not like. We have so many questions and so much to learn. We have already started researching to become better moth-ers. Soon, we hope, we will be learning how to improve our night time photography skills too.

This was our first night mothing and even though we didn’t attract many moths, we had so much fun. We will continue setting up mothing nights during the year and invite our friends and family to join and share in our discoveries.

We can hardly wait for next year’s NMW!

Yezzy mothing notebook Yezzy Night 1

Posted in event, Moth fun | Leave a comment

National Moth Week 2017 Report – India Biodiversity Portal

The IndianMoths group on IBP is the Indian partner for Moth Week and it has been hosting the event for the past 4 years. The National Moth Week 2017 was held between 22-30th July. The campaign witnessed good participation with over 350 observations being uploaded from across the country. Read a brief summary of the participation during the event on the IBP blog.

Atlas moth (Attacus atlas) (Image credits: Vipin Baliga)

Atlas moth (Attacus atlas) (Image credits: Vipin Baliga)

Posted in NMW Collaborators, partner | Leave a comment

Submitting moth observations – 2017 Poll

Where you submit your NMW 2017 observations?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Breakfast with moths – Guest post by Marnie Crowell

In spite of the rain the moths and the people showed up between 5AM and 9 AM for our Meet a Moth For Breakfast event. We had UV party lights, porch lights and even a bug zapper that had the zapping wires disconnected so people saw that moth watching does not have to be a high tech enterprise. The moths were a big hit! 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Project Noah Fun Fact: Isabella tiger moth

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

From Project Noah:

The Isabella tiger moth (Pyrrharctia isabella) is a tiger moth very common in North America. Subjected to a temperate climate, the caterpillars, known as banded woolly bears, overwinter as caterpillars before turning into a pupa in the spring, the stage of development right before coming a moths. Since the caterpillars are exposed to relatively harsh temperatures in the winter, this species has become somewhat tolerant to short-term freezing periods in which the entire caterpillar is frozen and it thaws out. Longer-term freezing periods however can be harmful.

This moth is also the subject of some folklore in which it is said that the amount of the brown on the band determines the length of the forthcoming winter. This however, is just folklore and not scientifically based.

Banded Woolly Bear (Pyrrharctia isabella), spotted by user Carol Snow Milne.

National Moth Week is from July 22-30. Are you participating? Please register a public or private event here: http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2017/, especially if your country or region isn’t on the map yet!

Don’t forget to submit photos of moths you spot here!

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8841449

Read more about the Isabella tiger moth’s ability to tolerate freezing as a larva here.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Project Noah Fun Fact: Walker’s Frother

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

From Project Noah:

Some tiger moths have glands that emit toxins when threatened. Many of these tiger moths are known in Australia as “frothers” for the bubbly toxins that come out of their thorax.

Walker's Frother (Amerila rubripes) spotted by user Felix Fleck on Project Noah.

Walker’s Frother (Amerila rubripes) spotted by user Felix Fleck on Project Noah.

National Moth Week is from July 22-30. Are you participating? Please register a public or private event here: http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2017/, especially if your country or region isn’t on the map yet!

Don’t forget to submit photos of moths you spot here!

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8841449

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Project Noah Fun Fact: Wasp Moth

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

From Project Noah:

Some tiger moths are excellent mimics of the order Hymenoptera, which includes ants, bees, sawflies, and wasps. They even have evolved a narrower abdomen and lost scales on some wings to mimic the narrow waist present in many hymenopterans, resulting in excellent wasp and ant mimics.

Wasp Moth (Myrmecopsis strigosa), spotted by user Tom15 on Project Noah.

National Moth Week is from July 22-30. Are you participating? Please register a public or private event here: http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2017/, especially if your country or region isn’t on the map yet!

Don’t forget to submit photos of moths you spot here!

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8841449

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Project Noah Fun Fact: Cinnabar moth

In honor of this year’s focus on tiger moths, our partner, citizen science website Project Noah will be featuring a fun fact about the tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) during National Moth Week.

From Project Noah:

Yesterday we discussed the ability of some tiger moth species to jam bat sonar. Some tiger moths are also very chemically defended. Some moths may sequester toxic plant chemicals, while others break down toxic chemicals found in their host plants and create new toxins for defense. Many organisms that are chemically defended also have aposematic, or warning coloration to indicate to predators that they are chemically defended.

The Cinnabar moth (Tyria jacobeae) is a moth which is chemically defended and aposematically colored, meaning it has warning coloration. It is native to Europe but was introduced in Oregon where is has been a successful biocontrol agent in the management of the invasive tansy ragwort.

Cinnibar moth (Tyria jacobeae), spotted by user Brian38 on Project Noah.

Cinnabar moth (Tyria jacobeae), spotted by user Brian38 on Project Noah.

National Moth Week is from July 22-30. Are you participating? Please register a public or private event here: http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2017/, especially if your country or region isn’t on the map yet!

Don’t forget to submit photos of moths you spot here!

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8841449

Read more about efforts to use the Cinnabar moth to control the invasive tansy ragwort here.

Posted in Moth Identification, Moth Information, Uncategorized | Leave a comment