NMW 2018 a huge success on iNaturalist!

iNaturalist had an incredible showing of moths worldwide for National Moth Week. Over 28,000 observations were made during the week from 24 registered countries, and all 50 US states!

Screenshot from iNaturalist showing National Moth Week 2018 project.

Screenshot from iNaturalist showing National Moth Week 2018 project.

Over the course of the week, 3,548 species wee observed and 1,502 community members helped 5,088 iNaturalist users identify their moths. 61% of observations have research grade distinction, meaning that they are deposited as records in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF)! Check out the observation totals by continent, country, and states/provinces below!

Map with observations of moths from the NMW 2018 project page of iNaturalist.

Map with observations of moths from the NMW 2018 project page of iNaturalist.

Continent Number of Observations
North America 24136
Europe 2429
Asia 1235
Australia 233
South America 153
Africa 104
Countries Number of Observations
United States 19,131
Canada 4,073
Hong Kong 699
Mexico 680
United Kingdom 377
Australia 233
Russia 132
Spain 82
India 73
Belgium 72
States/Provinces Number of Observations
Ontario 2,952
Texas 2,950
Alabama 2,481
Vermont 2,063
California 1,567
North Carolina 771
Ohio 664
New York 645
Pennsylvania 593
Virginia 499

In the United States alone, 2,031 species were observed for the week, which is incredible considering there are 12,776 species described from North America north of Mexico! This means that 15.9% of all moths described from this region were observed only in one week!

Screen Shot 2019-07-13 at 11.51.59 AMThe National Moth Week team urges you to contribute to science and biodiversity inventories by submitting your National Moth Week findings to iNaturalist! Our 2019 project can be found here and any submissions made for the dates of NMW 2019 (July 21-29) will be included in the project!

Register for NMW here.

About Jacob Gorneau

Jacob Gorneau is an undergraduate student studying entomology at Cornell University.
This entry was posted in Data Collection, Moth Identification, Mothing, partner. Bookmark the permalink.

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